Use To Be in a Sentence – How to use “To Be” in a sentence

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Use to be in a sentence. How to use the word to be in a sentence? Sentence examples with the word to be.

Use To Be in a Sentence - How to use "To Be" in a sentence

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Examples of to be in a sentence

  1. She wanted to humble herself before the strong man, to be humble and humble before him.
  2. Because of this integrated view of the world, distinctions between the secular and the sacred tend to be far less sharp than in the Western world.
  3. Antisocial acts are one and the same with anticosmic acts and are thus to be avoided because of their repercussions on the lineage, the community, and possibly the whole society.
  4. With rare exceptions, the African states can produce only a fraction of the needed capital from domestic savings, and they continue therefore to be dependent on outside sources.
  5. If much of his individual freedom is given up to their control, it is generally seen to be in his best interests; he finds his physical and psychological security in remaining one of them.
  6. The kings and lesser chiefs are thought to be either sacred themselves or entitled to own the sacred symbols of their offices.
  7. Unification will continue to be a long-range ambition of the African states because of its popular appeal to the younger elite.
  8. Whether the African states can long remain neutral in the face of the overpowering pressures that the Soviet Union and the United States are able to exert remains to be seen.
  9. Africa’s major markets remain in Europe, and the advantages gained by association with the European Common Market continue to be a factor in African development plans.
  10. A great variety of peoples, languages, and cultures is to be found on the continent of Africa.
  11. Often elassed as a variation of the Forest Negroid are the Nilotics, who tend to be taller and more slender, with narrower noses and less everted lips.
  12. In politics the authority centralized in chiefs and elders tends to be balanced by more “democratic” organizations of commoners.
  13. There are, to be sure, distinctions made between forces and persons that are visible and those that are invisible, between the corporeal and the incorporeal, but these are not separate realms of being that occasionally affect each other.
  14. The sources of disease, death, and poverty, for example, are not to be found solely in physical materials or events; they are to be found in the invisible forces of which the physical causes are merely visible manifestations.
  15. This forces him to carry out a strict schedule planning and to make true juggling games to be able to satisfy both.

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